Saturday, January 20, 2007

Good Planets 1/20/07

"Step out onto the Planet
Draw a circle a hundred feet round.

Inside the circle are
300 things nobody understands, and, maybe
nobody's ever really seen.

How many can you find?"

--Lew Welch quoted from "Earth Prayers"


Liza from Egret's Nest sent this photo of redwoods in her backyard -- they are examples of why Redwoods are called Sequioa Sempervirens -- the last part means everlasting. She writes, "Redwoods are amazing and beautiful trees and when I am in a redwood forest, I feel at peace!"
I found this peaceful scene at Peirce's Park in Longwood Gardens in Pa. - my husband and I enjoyed a few quiet moments together beneath these towering old trees.
Sarala sent this photo and wrote, "This is a tangle of kelp I saw on Pacific Beach, California. I think of kelp as nature's floatation device."
Cathy at Left Curve wonders what this strange-looking plant is that she photographed in Key West. Anyone know?
KGMom sent this photo from her travels to Labadi Beach, Accra, Ghana just before sunset. She writes, "The boat in the foreground is a typical fishing boat, although it doesn't look like it is in working order. However, Ghanaians are very resourceful; they may very well use this boat."
Bunnygirl shared this pic of her *own private peninsula* at Chapin Beach on Cape Cod.
She also sent this photo of the Abó Pueblo ruins - one of the Salinas pueblos.
Robin at Dharma Bums writes, "I've been trying for weeks to photograph a Golden-crowned or Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Because they are *continuously active* it is very difficult to get a good shot. They hop and flit in the bushes, making focusing very tricky. But persistence paid off, and I did get a fairly reasonable shot of this Ruby-crowned Kinglet just the other day. One of North America's smallest birds, the Ruby-crowned Kinglet can be recognized by its constant wing-flicking. The male shows its red crown only infrequently."
Kerrdelune of Beyond the Fields We Know shared this photo of the tattered remains of a milkweed pod.
Laurie from Dont Make Me Get My Flying Monkeys sent this photo taken near the headwaters of the Stillwater River above Nye, Montana.
Dawn shared two beautiful pics; this one of Mt Rainier from White Pass...
... and this gentleman who joined her hoping she might have a snack or two to share.
John at A DC Birding Blog sent this photo of the sunset on 1/15/07 at the grounds of the U.S. Capitol. The domed building visible on the horizon is the National Museum of the American Indian. The branch at the top is part of a large willow oak that stands about 30 yards from the Senate wing.
Evan writes, "This is a Tufted Titmouse taken in my backyard in Fairfax Va."
Sky writes, "Recent snowfalls in Puget Sound, Washington covered our giant sequoia in glittering white crystals where she stood regally dressed for our pleasure for 7 days! This photograph is cast in the blues of the afternoon light joining sky and snow. She is my favorite evergreen here where she overlooks one of our perennial rock gardens filled with spring's tulips, hyacinths, and iris followed by a summer festival of lilies, fuchsias, dahlias, coreopsis, liatris, and lavenders."
DivaKitty sent this photo taken while looking down on Carson Valley from Kingbury Grade in Tahoe, Nevada.

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Many thanks to those who submitted photos this week. Is it just me, or are they more spectacular each time?

My hope in hosting Good Planets is that the beauty shared here will cause someone to pause and consider all that we stand to lose if we continue to take this planet and its many wonders for granted. Step out into the world, draw your small circle and see what you can find within it that will bring you joy. Share that joy and do your part, however small, to see that it endures.

Everyone is invited to particpate in the Good Planets Show. Send your photos to me, lc-hardy AT comcast DOT net for inclusion in next Saturday's edition. If you're prone to procrastinate, send your pics for February to Wanderin Weeta (susannah AT dccnet DOT com). Maybe you'd like to host Good Planets on your own blog? Think about it and contact Robin at newdharmabums AT yahoo DOT com.

19 comments:

Michelle said...

Redwoods in her backyard!!??? Jealous.

I love these posts. So many fabulous photos. I see things that I think are pretty or cool, but lack the skills and perspective to take the breathtaking photos these folks have.

Thank you all for sharing such beauty.

Ruth said...

Once again you did a beautiful job of putting this together. The photos do get more spectacular and make me thankful to be a teeny part of this world.

NatureWoman said...

Beautiful photos again Laura and everyone who submitted them! I love seeing what everyone submits every week!

Mary said...

Thanks again, Laura. They are outstanding!

Pam in Tucson said...

Another great collection. I'm in awe of the great beauty of this planet and equally in awe of these beautiful images. I hope someone identifies the mystery fruit - I've never seen anything like it. Thanks to all the photographers and kudos to you, Laura, for a great post, wonderful quote and thoughtful comments. Bravo!

Liza Lee Miller said...

Laura, this was the best one ever! That poem at the beginning was fantastic! WOW!

All the pictures were spectacular! Raven! Anasazi ruins! Snow covered redwoods! Every picture was awesome!

You rock! I'm already thinking about what picture I'll take or find from my collection to share next week!

robin andrea said...

It is a treat to see all these magnificent sights on a Saturday morning. From Ghana to the Redwoods -- our beautiful planet.

bev said...

Another beautiful collection. Thanks once again everyone!

bev said...

Another beautiful collection. Thanks once again everyone!

Dawn said...

Thank you for hosting Laura and a beautiful compulation of photos again this week. I love Redwoods!

sarala said...

Thanks for hosting again. All the photos are great and do help remind me to cherish our planet.

vicki said...

Beautiful views on the world. You would think we could take better care of it, like an important book with fragile binding. Thank you for hosting again.

I don;t know what Cathy's plant is but we have the same lewd thing blooming away on our back fence in Florida and we have some names for it...

I was about to comment on your fetching duck below this morning right when I got called to board the plane. I think she is ever so sweet. Reminds me that when my grandmother was surprised or exasperated she would exclaim, "Well, God love a duck!"

Susan Gets Native said...

All of these are awesome!

Okay, I will be the crass one...( I usually am)
That plant, Cathy my cuz, looks like it should be called a vagina plant.
*Oh, Come ON! We are all girls here, right?


Well, God love a duck!

The Fat Lady Sings said...

Fabulous. Fabulous, fabulous! Each and every one deserves a frame around it. You know - that's something we should all do - those of us who participate. Offer up framed copies of our photos - with the proceeds going to charity. There are so many truly magical, whimsical photos. I've seen several I would give my eye-teeth for. I'd just love to hang them here in my office. So - what do you think? Good idea?

Sky said...

Cathy, I believe the plant in question is a variety of a ladyslipper. Quite lovely little flower, all puffed as though it is filled with air.

Great job Laura. :)

Lynne said...

Oooh Susan! I thought that flower looked like lady parts too! LOL!!!

somebunnysloveDOTcom said...

Thanks for posting the photos. Nature always produces such breath-taking images for us. I wish I had the environment and weather here to show the same!
=:8

maggie said...

I love the beginning piece how fabulous and true. It's like seeing the world through your toddlers eye's. Another fabulous group of photos........you do good work.

Floridacracker said...

Great photos and a super hosting job again.
The duck below is too cute.